Elves Exist as as Quasi-Abstract Entities

astatism
Statetheism
The problem with A Documentary Theory of States and Their Existence as Quasi-Abstract Entities – by by Edward Heath Robinson
The paper argues that states do not have a place in the traditional Platonist duality of the concrete and the abstract.

And because geopolitical theories that recognize the existence of quasi-abstract states will have greater explanatory power than theories that deny their existence, the existence of quasi-abstract states should not be rejected on the basis of the Principle of Parsimony.

A summary

A Documentary Theory of States and Their Existence as Quasi-Abstract Entities
EDWARD HEATH ROBINSON Department of Geography and Geographic Information Science,The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA

This article is concerned with the existence of states as a matter of fact, and it approaches that subject within the context of the ontology of social reality as a whole. It argues, first, that states do not have a place in the traditional Platonist duality of the concrete and the abstract. Second, that states belong to a third category –the quasi-abstract – that has received philosophical attention with a recently emerging theory of documentality. Documentality, derived from Austin’s theory of performative utterances, claims that documents acts can bring quasi-abstract objects, such as states into being. Third and finally, it argues that the existence of quasi-abstract states should not be rejected on the basis of the Principle of Parsimony, because geopolitical theories that recognize the existence of quasi-abstract states will have greater explanatory power than theories that deny their existence.
INTRODUCTION
It appears that geopolitical entities exist. It appears that we live in a world of armies, navies, trade organizations, nations, governments, nongovernmental organizations, federal political units, counties, electoral districts, provinces, and most significantly for this article – states, which have long been a major focus of political geography. However, at a foundational level, the legitimacy of these entities as subjects of academic, and especially scientific, investigation confronts an ontological problem not faced by the subjects of physical geography. Whereas rivers, lakes, and mountains have an existence independent of what people believe about them, it sometimes seems that many of the subjects of human geography only exist because people believe they exist. Many scholars, including philosopher John Searle, have recognized this as a critical issue for the study of the social world. Although there appears to be an objective reality of geopolitical entities, and social entities more broadly, their mind-dependent nature calls into question whether or not such entities actually exist, and therefore whether investigating them can result in knowledge. For example, if the United States only exists because people agree it exists, is its existence an objective fact?

From https://www.scribd.com/document/284080309/A-Documentary-Theory-of-States-and-Their-Existence

Based on the ontological theory of documentality, this paper argues that states are quasi-abstract objects (with position in time but not in space) that are often established by the constitutive powers of certain document acts.

Note the language here: “constitutive powers of certain document acts” a fancy way of saying someone wrote something down, and as the writings persist so does the entity exist so long as the documents do.

Conclusion: Elves Exist because there are books that say Elves exists.

 

Reification or Nominalization who cares?

So what?

The fact that states or countries do not objectively exist may be nothing more than an a philosophical point unworthy of much consideration until we explore the deeper implications of this issue.

In psychology there is an idea of integration or an ‘aha ! moment where an apparently abstract concept fully solidifies in a persons psyche.

Here is a video from Marc Stevens exploring one aspect of this critical aspect of reality

 

 

An Apple in Valhalla

Valhalla is a mythological location believed by some to be objectively real or to ‘exist’ in a real sense, at least for those who have held or hold Norse mythology as not mythical.

Existence according to Googles Alexa

For convenience, here is Wikipedia’s description: In Norse mythology, Valhalla (from Old Norse Valhöll “hall of the slain” is a majestic, enormous hall located in Asgard, ruled over by the god Odin. Chosen by Odin, half of those who die in combat travel to Valhalla upon death, led by valkyries, while the other half go to the goddess Freyja’s field Fólkvangr...

I chose Valhalla as an example because like states, it has been written about, and held to be a fact by many people, at least at some time in human history – and yet held to be mythological (not real) by most people.

Imagine placing an apple into a cowboy hat – if you had a green apple and a red cowboy hat, could this be done?

You can put an apple into an oven, a hat or a sock.

But, can you put an apple in Valhalla?

No, because an apple is real, but Valhalla is not.

In the same way, can you as a real person, made of mostly water, be within a state or country?

A girl that was born in Dragisa Misovic Medical Center in Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) in 1964 visits the same hospital in 2017 – does she return to her place of birth in Yugoslavia (imaginary) or merely her place of birth at the physical location, a brick building?

We have never (objectively) been within a state or country.

So this begs the question – have you ever been a resident or citizen?

 

 

Reason Evidence and Politics – or when Atheists behave like religious extremists.

Many of my cohorts give high regard to reason and evidence, ‘let the facts lead where they may’ could be a mantra or prayer.

But when it comes to applying this heuristic to certain domains, skeptics may show as much resistance to evidence as anyone they might otherwise mock as a religious kook.

A popular scientific model holds that existence, reality itself is composed of matter + energy + the interactions or effects thereof – e.g. angle, momentum inertia etc.

So, buy definition things that ‘exist ‘ only in the mind, or imaginary things regardless of how vividly held or popularly believed, do not exist, they are not real.

For example, many people believe in ghosts, and yet the skeptic would point out that there is no empirical evidence that ghosts exist, they are held to be imaginary by Science.

What can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence.” – Hitchens

So what of states or countries – do they hold an independent existence outside of the mind?

Certainly they are not the land itself, as the land has been here long before the invention of states and will persist in our absence.

What we have here is an example of a near universally held and rarely challenged logical fallacy.

The fallacy is termed nominalization in NLP (Neuro  Linguistic Programming), or Reification (also known as concretism, hypostatization, or the fallacy of misplaced concreteness) is a fallacy of ambiguity, when an abstraction (abstract belief or hypothetical construct) is treated as if it were a concrete real event or physical entity. In other words, it is the error of treating something that is not concrete, such as an idea, as a concrete thing. A common case of reification is the confusion of a model with reality: “the map is not the territory”.

Reification is part of normal usage of natural language (just like metonymy for instance), as well as of literature, where a reified abstraction is intended as a figure of speech, and actually understood as such. But the use of reification in logical reasoning or rhetoric is misleading and usually regarded as a fallacy – (Wikipedia)

Next post : Why this matters, a lot.

Astatism is like Atheism

Astatism is, in the broadest sense, the absence of belief in the existence of states. Less broadly, astatism is the rejection of belief that any states or countries exist. In an even narrower sense, astatism is specifically the position that there are no states. Atheism is contrasted with statism, which, in its most general form, is the belief that at least one state or country exists.